GroCycle

Product GroCycle

From Coffee Grounds To Mushrooms

The GroCycle project was launched to make use of the tonnes of waste coffee grounds dumped in landfill every year. Creating healthy food from urban waste doesn’t get much more innovative than this!

You may have heard of surplus fruit and veg being used for a multitude of different things in an effort to reduce food waste. But what could you possibly eat from waste coffee grounds? Your own home-grown gourmet mushrooms, that’s what.

Did you know that less than 1% of the coffee plant ends up in the cup? Yet the waste grounds are packed full of nutrients. These grounds are usually discarded, ending up in landfill where they produce harmful methane gases. However they can be put to good use, and make an ideal fertiliser for growing Oyster and Shiitake mushrooms.

The Ultimate Guide to Reducing Food Waste at Home

Download our free PDF guide to reducing food waste. It’s packed full of tips and recipes to help you eat well and waste less.

Find out more

Grow Your Own At Home

Launched in 2011, Adam Sayner and Eric Jong’s social enterprise GroCycle began with the daily collection of waste coffee grounds from cafes in and around Plymouth. They began to produce compost and to grow Oyster mushrooms, selling them locally.

Today, GroCycle has grown massively; it has produced the UK’s first Urban Mushroom Farm and created DIY Mushroom Grow Kits. They also offer online courses, teaching amateurs like you and me how to grow our own mushrooms from coffee grounds.

You’ll even find their mushrooms in some of the best restaurants in the South West of England.

Given the UK imports almost £200 million worth of mushrooms each year, (which are undoubtedly less fresh and more expensive than home-grown ones), why not join them and give it a go yourself?

Order a Gourmet Mushroom Kit online and not only will you get to enjoy your very own home-grown mushrooms in just 14 days, but you’ll also be safe in the knowledge that you’re doing a little bit to help cut waste and reduce pollution. Not mushroom for improvement there, it would seem!

Sign up for our weekly newsletter, jam packed with advice, recipes, reviews and inspiration.

The Food Rush uses the information you provide to send you regular content updates, news, offers and promotions. We won’t share your details with anyone else unless consent is given. You are free to unsubscribe at any time. For more info, check our privacy policy.